Oven Roasted Tomatoes

Sun-dried tomatoes are delicious, but expensive. It never occurred to me that I can make my own so easily. Well, the ones I make are actually oven roasted rather than sun-dried. While the sun drying process takes a couple of weeks, oven roasting only takes a few hours.

I emailed my grandma for a tomato recipe and she sent me this link, which is wonderfully simple. Ingredients = tomatoes and salt.

After my first tomato roasting experience, I’ve become addicted. We’ve had so many baby tomatoes from our garden the past few months, that we were able to roast a jar of them every week.

When roasting tomatoes of various sizes, it helps to check them every now and then. Some will burn while some will remain soft. Take out the smaller ones when they are crispy and leave the bigger ones in a little longer.

Slice them in half and spread them out face up in the oven. Sprinkle salt on top and cook on low (200 degrees-ish) for 2-3 hrs. If the tomatoes are larger, more time may be required.

The roasting process accentuates the sweetness of the tomatoes. When all the tomatoes are shriveled up and slightly crunchy, I put them in a sterilized jar with olive oil, garlic, fresh basil, and oregano.

I love this intense flavor – especially when sprinkled on tacos and baked potatoes,  mashed up into a pesto and spread on crackers, or just eaten with a fork out of the jar.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Oven Roasted Tomatoes

  1. This is so cool! I’m totally going to try this one day. Who knew that sun-dried and oven-roasted would be such close cousins.
    Thanks for sharing it.

  2. Please, please store this in the fridge and don’t keep it longer than a week or two. Oil packed items are botulism hazards. A sterile jar is not enough precaution. I’ve seen oil-packed items with botulism from my own experiments gone awry. Botulism can kill you. Here’s more information. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iyh-vsv/food-aliment/garlic-ail_e.html

  3. While it’s true that there are botulism hazards, my mother’s boyfriend who is Italian, and has been creating his own homemade varieties of oil-packed items (mushrooms, tomatoes, eggplant etc.) with garlic and herbs for decades. It was passed down to him, and he never alters these recipes he loves. He leaves them out too, and nothing bad ever happens. It’s important that you keep the contents fully covered with olive oil, but if the weather is really hot and humid, I would refrigerate them.

    Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s